Tag Archives: #Lent

40 Days in His Way

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Working in ministry, liturgical seasons just simply move way too fast. It seems like yesterday Advent was on our doorstep and now we are almost 2 weeks into Lent. Our 8 week bible study with Jeff Cavins is drawing to a close and small group Lenten study has already begun. We have a food pantry drive and collection over the next 2 weeks, and a Collaborative Lenten service event for End Hunger where volunteers meet to package simple, nutritious meals for those in need within the New England area. Not to mention, as new collaborative (2 parishes now working together) there is evangelistic and leadership training, council and liturgy meetings, and the gathering of individuals to write a new pastoral plan. We are most certainly a collaborative on the move! In fact, several of the leadership team are flying out today to be a part of the Amazing Parish Conference in Atlanta.

In the midst of all these incredible community blessings, I have been trying to take the time myself to rediscover all the ways God is calling me personally to conversion and transformation. This year’s Lent for me has been all about trust. Why trust? Well, with so many balls in the air, including seeking the sale of our home, I have needed to go deeper than a mere lip service of saying I trust God. Over and over again these past few weeks I have had to let go of timelines, expectations and results. Not an easy task when you are detail oriented by nature. Yet, what I have noticed is that when I am truly keeping my eyes focused on Christ, all the rest fades away into the background.

One service project that has surfaced for me this Lent is the 40 bags/boxes in 40 days challenge of de-cluttering for simplicity and charity.Perfect timing as my family prepares to potentially move out of our home of 20 years. So many things we have not used over the years that could be of use to someone else. Why do we accumulate stuff and hold on to things that we honestly do not need anymore? Sentimentality, and security? With every bag or box packed, however, my family is gaining valuable space and awareness of the way that clutter can occupy our lives. In our culture of accumulation I can honesty say we could do with “Less” in order to appreciate what it is that we”Need”. We need space in our days and our homes that only God can fill.

Reflect:

Take time today to see what is filling your day, your home, and occupies your time. Is there room for growth, and space for need?

Peace,Signature

Worth Revisiting: Sacrifice

“It is by the apostolic preaching of the Gospel that the people of God is called together and gathered so that all who belong to this people, sanctified as they are by the Holy Spirit, may offer themselves ‘a living sacrifice, holy and acceptable to God’.”

Vatican II, Presbyterorum ordinis, 2

With Lent fast approaching, this word sacrifice frequently looms and weighs upon our hearts as something undesired or sought after and yet something we are being asked to pursue. Could it be that we are working with a poor understanding of the rich true meaning of what it is to sacrifice? First as Christ has shown, and St. Paul reiterates, a sacrifice isn’t static or dead. In fact, rather than as an action performed it is more of a state of being. We are to be a ‘living sacrifice’, a testament to the continual love we have come to know as followers of Christ.

So, then we are brought to the heart of the matter. Sacrifice flows out of love. One cannot truly offer sacrifice without having experienced love otherwise it becomes a complaint ridden, shallow and inadequate substitute. It also entails giving of ourselves at a cost- from our need rather than our surplus. Just like the widow’s might, this is what it is to give and witness love.

As a young mom, I remember the countless sleepless nights- of feedings and changings, of fevers and nightmares, as well as, the meager availability of sleep and time. Yet, I cannot imagine making any other choice, than to give all that I am for the life and welfare of this great love entrusted to me. Sacrifice then also carries with it gratitude and responsibility. It is a graced notion of incorporation, for the needs of others can then remarkably become our own.

This Lent, take a moment to think of the profoundly beautiful invitation to sacrifice, to be a living witness to the love of a Father, the gift of the Son and of the Spirit’s renewal of hearts and lives.

Am I seeking to be transformed this Lent?

Is my sacrifice deep and life affirming? If not, what might God be asking me to do differently?

724f2-ashwednesdaycross“Let us remember that love lives through sacrifice and is nourished by giving…Without sacrifice there is no love.” –Maximillian Kolbe

724f2-ashwednesdaycross“True love grows by sacrifice and the more thoroughly the soul rejects natural satisfaction the stronger and more detached its tenderness becomes…”           –Teresa of Avila

724f2-ashwednesdaycross“Miss no single opportunity of making some small sacrifice, here by a smiling look, there by a kindly word; always doing the smallest right and doing it all for love.”

 ― Thérèse de Lisieux

724f2-ashwednesdaycross“Jesus says; ‘My daughter, I want to instruct you on how you are to rescue souls through sacrifice and prayer. You will save more souls through prayer and suffering than will a missionary through his teachings and sermons alone. I want to see you as a sacrifice of living love, which only then carries weight before Me… And great will be your power for whomever you intercede. Outwardly, your sacrifice must look like this: silent, hidden, permeated with love, imbued with prayer.”

– Diary of Saint Faustina

724f2-ashwednesdaycross“If God sends you many sufferings, it is a sign that He has great plans for you and certainly wants to make you a saint. And if you wish to become a great saint, entreat Him yourself to give you much opportunity for suffering; for there is no wood better to kindle the fire of holy love than the wood of the cross, which Christ used for His own great sacrifice of boundless charity.”-St. Ignatius Loyola

724f2-ashwednesdaycross“A sacrifice to be real must cost, must hurt, must empty ourselves. The fruit of silence is prayer, the fruit of prayer is faith, the fruit of faith is love, the fruit of love is service, the fruit of service is peace.”- Mother Teresa

724f2-ashwednesdaycross“Those who are willing to lose their own consolation for their neighbors’ welfare receive and gain me and their neighbors…and so they enjoy the graciousness of my charity at all times. […] Then she must love her neighbors with such affection that she would bear any pain of torment to win them the life of grace, ready to die a thousand deaths, if that were possible, for their salvation. And all her material possessions are at the service of her neighbors’ physical needs.” –Saint Catherine of Sienna

724f2-ashwednesdaycross“If we love each other enough, we will bear with each other’s faults and burdens.
If we love enough, we are going to light a fire in the hearts of others. And it is love that will burn out the sins and hatreds that sadden us. It is love that will make us want to do great things for each other. No sacrifice and no suffering will then seem too much.”       –Dorothy Day

724f2-ashwednesdaycross“Once we come to realize how much God has given us, a life of self-sacrifice, of working for him and for others, becomes a privileged way of responding to his great love.”

Pope Francis

724f2-ashwednesdaycross“Love Jesus, love Him very much, but to do this, be ready to love sacrifice more”. –Padre Pio

Peace,

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Worth Revisiting {Ash} Wednesday

Ash Wednesday Edition!

Today as we begin the season of Lent I thought that this beloved Catholic funny was definitely worth revisiting!  Beyond the obvious, when many of us have left with just a smear across our forehead, I see myself. (As a bit of perspective, I have actually corrected the cross of ashes on my forehead more than once in my life!) For so many years, I have let my own desire of perfectionism determine the outcome of success. It is a fruitless game of never fully being pleased. and where often the reason why we even tried gets lost in our own sense of pride.

True, this time of Lent is intended to work on those things in our life that distance us from God. However, we cannot do this solely on our own, nor were we ever meant to. Rather than seeking control, by forcing a square peg in a round hole, we are to allow God to chip away at our sins and challenges. To shape us in the true image we were always intended to be.

This is why I encourage you this Lent to:

  • Let go of who you think you once were, or who others have defined you to be to allow God to accomplish His work and what he wills within you. We cannot be transformed if we retain our old selves.
  •  Carve out space and time for both quiet reflection and dialogue.These next 40 days are a gift- an invitation to slow down, get away, and spend time with your heavenly Father. Jesus himself recognized the need to leave his everyday surroundings and daily to-do’s for clarification and direction. Yet, without ready access to a dessert..we have to create the time and space in our lives apart from the noise.
  • Whatever you choose to do differently, agree to make it meaningful. If you decide to pick up a devotion this Lent, whether it be the rosary, adoration time, daily mass, Bible study, Liturgy of the Hours, or the Examen resist rushing through to check it off your list. Rather than passively going about this time be purposeful in seeking direction and unhurried in reaching a destination. Keeping in mind that our faith is a journey- one in which Our Father not only meets us but leads and indeed carries us home.
  • Oh, and don’t forget..

God Makes Beautiful Things Out of Dust!

 

Peace,

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Why Pray the Stations of the Cross?

 Re-posting this today  as the stations are a beautiful invitation to walk with Christ ..and one that in true Jesuit imagining I invite you to consider. If you possibly can,  make time today to pray the stations as a community.

This past week as I accompanied my 4th grade students, from this past summer, for the Stations of the Cross I began to think…Why do we not do this more often? Here, we have been given this beautiful imaginative way to immerse ourselves in the story of the Passion of our Lord. More than merely listening we are asked to contemplate the scene, and walk in faith with Christ on the way to the cross. As we picture the faces of the crowd, the thoughts of the disciples, and the heart of Christ himself we glimpse the magnitude of the sacrifice of love that has been given to us. If you have never participated in the Stations of the Cross before, all are welcome, just call your local parish for the date and time. This is a graced pilgrimage and one that I hope that you too will make this Lent.

The First Station: Jesus Is Condemned – Tried unjustly for crimes he didn’t commit, would we have spoken up for Jesus? Do I speak up for others?

The Second Station: Jesus Takes up His Cross – Oh the sight of Christ beaten, crowned with thorns, and now asked to carry the cross! Do I seek to feel compassion for those carrying burdens?

The Third Station: Jesus Falls the First Time –Would I have rushed to His side? Am I a source of strength for others?

The Fourth Station: Jesus Meets His Sorrowful Mother – As a ‘sword piercing her heart’, the pain Mary felt to see her Son had to have been tremendous and yet she was there beside him. Do I meet others in their pain or only in joy?

The Fifth Station: Simon Helps to Carry the Cross – Chosen because he was different, Simon was called upon to carry Jesus’ cross. What unique gifts do I have that could serve Christ today?

 The Sixth Station: Veronica Offers Her Veil to Jesus – This woman seeing a way to help Jesus, in turn leaves with his image on her veil and in her heart. Do my actions today bear the image of Christ?

 The Seventh Station: Jesus Falls the Second Time –  Weak and weary, the weight of the cross with our sinfulness was greater than anything we have ever known. How does my own sinfulness weigh on me today?

    The Eighth Station: Jesus meets the Weeping Women –  Jesus meets the women with a profound understanding of the pain our sin carries. Do I consider the effects of my sin on others though the things I do or fail to do?

The Ninth Station: Jesus Falls the Third Time – Pushed and prodded on, there was to be no rest for Jesus on the way to the cross. Yet, we find rest in Christ who continually strengthens us and shares our burdens.

The Tenth Station: Jesus Is Stripped of His Clothing- Humiliated and stripped of his dignity, oh how our Savior seeks for us to see the suffering of our most vulnerable.

The Eleventh Station: Jesus Is Nailed to the Cross – What a cruel scene that lays before our eyes- and yet the love that is poured out as You take on our sins upon Yourself! Help me dear Lord to live this life in gratitude for your sacrifice, help me to love You and your creation as I should.

The Twelfth Station: Jesus Dies on the Cross – Forgiveness You have given for those who sought to crucify you. Christ forgive me of my sins, and guide me to extend forgiveness to all I encounter in life.

  The Thirteenth Station: Jesus Is Taken Down From the Cross – Holding the body of her Son in her arms, we dare to imagine the loss and pain that Mary felt in this moment. In those times that I have experienced loss, do I rely on the strength of God and my brothers and sisters in Christ to carry me?

The Fourteenth Station: Jesus Is Laid in the Tomb –  As  Joseph and Nicodemus lay Jesus in the tomb, joined by Mary the mother of Jesus and Mary Magdalen  we imagine the stone that is rolled into place.  For those times we too are asked to place our trust in the events of our lives, unknowing what is to come next we pray for guidance.

The Resurrection – We know that this last station is not the end of the story- For Christ has risen and calls us all to a new life in Him! Let my life be a witness to his Passion and revealing of his love to the world!

Peace,

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An Engaging Faith: Donna-Marie Cooper O’Boyle

You are invited to join me this week for An Engaging Faith on Breadbox Media daily at 4pm EST

Breaking into your ordinary
with the extraordinary …

 

Over the next few weeks, as part of this blog, I will be highlighting a guest from An Engaging Faith. If you have missed any of these shows it will be a perfect opportunity to catch up! *Today 3/11/16 we also have a Live show with Margaret Felice!

As it is Lent, I invite you to tune in with several of our featured Lenten authors… 

Radio Interview with Donna-Marie Cooper O’Boyle

donna-marie-cooper-oboyle.pngDonna-Marie Cooper O’Boyle, is an award-winning Catholic writer, speaker, retreat leader, and host of Catholic Mom’s Café and Everyday Blessings for Catholic Moms on EWTN. A wife and mother of five, Cooper O’Boyle was recognized as one of the Top Ten Most Fascinating Catholics in 2009 by Faith & Family Live. She enjoyed a decade-long friendship with Blessed Mother Teresa of Calcutta and became a Lay Missionary of Charity. For many years her spiritual director was Servant of God John A. Hardon, S.J., who also served as one of Mother Teresa’sBringing Lent Home with Pope Francis spiritual directors. Donna  is the author of several books on faith and family, including the Bringing Lent Homeseries, Rooted in Love, Mother Teresa and Me, and The Kiss of Jesus. She has been featured in a number of religious publications and on Catholic radio, and is a frequent guest on EWTN’s Bookmark, Sunday Night Prime, and EWTN Live. She lives in Connecticut with her family. Here to talk to us about her Lenten book, Bringing Lent Home with Pope Francis.

Worth Revisiting:Family Mission

While we often give much thought to how we can individually allow others to see Christ in us, it occurred to me that as a family we hadn’t really given this much thought.  So, this Lent I  want to focus on 5 qualities that we as a family consider important. Not only those that we feel we do well at, but those that we have to consistently strive towards. 

Pray Constantly (1 Thessalonians 5:17) “Pray without ceasing”//To this my youngest, Thomas age 9 said, “Oh I do that one all of the time! I pray in the morning before school that I will have a wonderful day, or if I have a problem. Then at night, I pray as a family and say and Our Father and Hail Mary’s as I fall asleep.” What a neat insight into my son’s spiritual life that this exercise had given me!

Speak Truthfully  (Proverbs 12:22) “Lying lips are an abomination to the LORD,but those who are truthful, his delight”// Surprisingly here, Thomas added, “That one can be tough because sometimes I say yes or no to questions before I really think about whether I have done what is being asked” “So, I pressed, do you do this on purpose?” “No, I don’t really mean to- just answer because I am used to giving that answer..but sometimes I haven’t done what I am supposed to have done. ” Do, you try to fix that? To make your answer truthful by then doing it?” “No, and that is what I am working on”

Serve Faithfully (1 Samuel 12:24) “Serve him faithfully with all your heart, for you have seen the great things the LORD has done among you” // Our family places great importance on serving others both within the parish setting and in those we encounter. Over the past 12 years, though my service in various ministries has increasingly grown I find that I actually have more time. Or perhaps the time that I have apart from serving is simply more enjoyable because of the joy that it has given me. As a Eucharistic minister to the nursing homes, My husband has also stepped in to lead Why Catholic when needed and to serve at mass through the collection and communion. 15 year old Peter has been an altar server since 3rd grade and now serves additionally at mass in his school. Thomas helps me prepare for Children’s Liturgy and is fervent in supporting the missionary Childhood association and the needy in our area.  I say this not to praise these works but to speak to the call to serve that we feel so profoundly.

Love Patiently (1 Cor 13:4) “Love is patient, love is kind. It is not jealous, [love] is not pompous, it is not inflated”// Perhaps one of the most beloved wedding readings, it is so incredibly important to keep in mind in our families. Hand in hand with

Forgiving Generously, (Col 3:13) in “Bearing with one another and forgiving one another”// it requires being accepting of one another’s faults, failings and misgivings and meeting these with Love. This is a daily challenge for me as a mom, in my desire to lead with love while also helping to form them in their chosen paths in life. For my 15 year old it means committedly resolving this Lent to be kinder in his responses to his little brother, as he seeks to annoy. Without a doubt,  I am sure that each of us can find ways to be more loving and forgiving to one another not only during this season of Lent but all year long!

In Peace and Love,

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An Engaging Faith: 2/29-3/4

You are invited to join me this week for An Engaging Faith on Breadbox Media daily at 4pm EST

Breaking into your ordinary
with the extraordinary …

We start off our week with Simplifying The Soul-Lenten Practices to Renew Your Spirit with Paula Huston, then Jamie Arpin-Ricci joins us to discuss Vulnerable Faith: Missional Living in the Radical Way of St. Patrick Paraclete Press, Jack Levison with 40 Days with the Holy Spirit: Fresh Air for Every Day.

…and Encores of the Catholic Relief Services Columbia Trip 2016 Recap with Lisa Hendey and Sherry Brownrigg  and Saying Yes! with Albert Haase, OFM


Paula HustonMonday:
 Paula Huston
, a National Endowment for the Arts fellow, wrote literary fiction for more than twenty years before shifting her focus to spirituality. She taught writing and literature at Cal Poly, San Luis Obispo, and currently mentors graduate students in creative nonfiction for Seattle Pacific University’s MFA in Creative Writing program.

Her first nonfiction project was Signatures of Grace, for which she served as co-editor and contributor; it earned a starred review from Publishers Weekly. Her book The Holy Way, which garnered another PW starred review, was a Catholic Press Association award-winner, a Catholic Book Club major selection, and a ForeWord Magazine bronze medalist for Book of the Year in Religion. Huston’s other spiritual nonfiction includes By Way of Grace, Forgiveness, Simplifying the Soul, and A Season of Mystery. A Camaldolese Benedictine Oblate, Huston is married, has four children and four grandchildren, and lives on the central California coast.

Tuesday: Jamie Arpin-Ricci, is the author of The Cost of Community: Jesus, St. Francis and Life in the Kingdom and the pastor of Little Flowers Community in the inner city of Winnipeg. He has spent two decades serving in ministry among the urban poor, both in North America and abroad. Here today to talk about Vulnerable Faith: Missional Living in the Radical Way of St. Patrick by Paraclete Press.

 

Wednesday: Jack Levison – holds the W. J. A. Power Chair of Biblical Hebrew and Old Testament Interpretation at Perkins School of Theology, Southern Methodist University and is “the most competent scholar and clearest writer on the Holy Spirit that I have known,” according to Eugene Peterson. A contributor to parade.comrelevant.com, and beliefnet.com, Jack has written Fresh Air: The Holy Spirit for an Inspired Life to wide acclaim. His writings have been translated into German, Spanish, and Korean. He joins us today to discuss 40 DAYS WITH THE HOLY SPIRIT: Fresh Air for Every Day.

Thursday: Catholic Relief Services Columbia Trip 2016 Recap with Lisa Hendey and Sherry Brownrigg This Lent, as they have for four decades, millions of Catholics around the United States will place a colorful cardboard box and calendar in their homes to begin a spiritual journey that changes lives around the world.

For Catholic families, the “CRS Rice Bowl Effect” begins conversations about Lent and their faith, about the role of charity, and about the many different people who make up our world family.  For Catholic parishes and schools, it unites communities for Lenten faith reflection around the spirit of serving those in need and the good work of the Church around the globe.  And for those who benefit from its charity, the “Rice Bowl Effect” is a key to a better life.

Friday:  Ordained a Franciscan priest in 1983, Albert Haase, OFM, is a popular preacher, teacher, spiritual director and radio talk show guest. A former missionary to mainland China for over eleven years, he is the award-winning author of nine books on popular spirituality and the presenter on four bestselling DVDs. He trains spiritual directors in the diocese of Springfield, IL. He lives in Texas. Visit his website at www.AlbertOFM.org

Worth Revisiting: Marian Consecration

Contemporary Version featuring JP II, Mother Teresa and Maximilian Kolbe

This Lent, I have decided to grow in my own understanding of Christ through St. Louis de Montfort’s Consecration to Jesus through Mary. Having taken February 20th as my start date, I have entered a “retreat” of sorts with the culmination on March 25th The Annunciation of Mary.

By Daderot on Tiffany glass

The feast of the Annunciation of the Lord celebrates the angel Gabriel’s appearance to the Virgin Mary  with the announcement that the Blessed Virgin had been chosen to be the Mother of Our Lord, and Mary’s “Yes!”  (fiat) to God’s holy plan.(Luke 1:26-38)

For me, this Marian feast day has special significance, in that it is a very real glimpse into the answer that God asks of each of us. Quite simply, and humbly, we give our “yes!” to what God has planned and willed in each of our lives. Far greater and vastly different from anything we could ever imagine, it requires we surrender ourselves fully.

With that, I look forward to speaking  these words of Consecration (Day 34),

“I, Elizabeth, a faithless sinner, renew and ratify today in thy hands the vows of my Baptism; I renounce forever Satan, his pomps and works; and I give myself entirely to Jesus Christ, the Incarnate Wisdom, to carry my cross after Him all the days of my life, and to be more faithful to Him than I have ever been before…

O faithful Virgin, make me in all things so perfect a disciple, imitator and slave of the Incarnate Wisdom, Jesus Christ thy Son, that I may attain, by thine intercession and by thine example, to the fullness of His age on earth and of His glory in Heaven. Amen.” ¹Signature

¹Louis De Montfort, “True Devotion” p.198.

An Engaging Faith: 2/22-2/26

You are invited to join me this week for An Engaging Faith on Breadbox Media daily at 4pm EST

Breaking into your ordinary
with the extraordinary …

We start off our week with Make Room: A Child’s Guide to Lent and Easter with Laura Alary , then Jonathan Montaldo joins us to discuss Bridges to Contemplative Living with Thomas Merton, Lent & Holy Week  published by Ave Maria Press, Susan Vogt with Blessed By Less: Clearing Your Life of Clutter by Living Lightly.

…an Encore of Monsignor John Enzler with the classic Lenten devotional Way of the Cross.


Laura AlaryMonday:
 Laura Alary
 is a writer, storyteller, and religious educator. She has a B.A. from Dalhousie, an M.Div. from the University of Toronto, and a Ph.D. from University of St. Michael’s College. Laura has three creative and curious children. She leads workshops, teaches university courses, and works with children at a local congregation. Laura lives in Toronto, Canada.She joinsus today to discuss Make Room: A Child’s Guide to Lent and Easter.

 

Tuesday: Jonathan Montaldo has served as the associate director of the Merton Institute for Contemplative Living, the director of the Thomas Merton Center, and as president of the International Thomas Merton Society. He edited or coedited many volumes of Merton’s writing, including The Intimate Merton, Dialogues with Silence, and A Year with Thomas Merton. He presents retreats Lent and Holy Weekinternationally based on Merton’s witness to contemplative living. Montaldo will join us to discuss one of the ten-volume series for small group dialogue, Bridges to Contemplative Living with Thomas Merton, Lent & Holy Week  published by Ave Maria Press.

Wednesday: Susan Vogt is a speaker, author of five books, and former editor of the Journal of the National Association of Catholic Family Life Ministers. For over 30 years, Susan has worked in familyBlessed By Less  ministry for the Catholic Church. Susan and her husband have worked with ecumenical and social justice organizations including Parenting for Peace and Justice. Susan is married, has four children, and lives in Covington, Kentucky. She joins us to discuss Blessed By Less: Clearing Your Life of Clutter by Living Lightly.

 

Thursday: Fr. John Julian OJN, has practiced contemplative prayer daily since 1985 as a semi-enclosed monk. He is an Episcopal priest and the author of thirteen books. He has been an actor, a professor, a Letters to Jacob: Mostly about Contemplative Prayerparish priest, a TV commentator, a camp director, a bookseller, the dean of an experimental seminary, the director of social worker training, and has read and studied the work of Julian of Norwich daily for over a quarter century. We will be discussing his book Letters to Jacob: Mostly About Contemplative Prayer.

Felice Fridays!: Margaret Felice, Boston College alumnae and faculty member of Religion and Performing Arts at BC High in Boston MA, Opera Singer and blogger joins us for a fun an engaging talk about all things Catholic! 

Margaret Felice has been praised for her dynamic stage presence, artistic versatility, and “drop-dead gorgeous voice” (Boston Musical Intelligencer). Her repertoire ranges from classical opera to modern musical theater, from early music to the Great American Songbook, but all of her performances have one thing in common: a commitment to entertaining her audience with musical integrity and creative presentation. MargaretFelice.com

 

An Engaging Faith: 2/8-2/12

You are invited to join me this week for An Engaging Faith on Breadbox Media daily at 4pm EST

Getting ready for Lent with great invitations for Reflection and Action!

Greg Wolfe with God For Us, Fr. Don Maldari with The Creed, Fr. Albert Haase with Saying Yes!,  Karee Santos, will be joining  us again this time to talk about how to celebrate Valentine’s during Lent…

and Encores Fr. Paul Farren with Freedom & Forgiveness: A Fresh look at the Sacrament of Reconciliation and Danielle Shroyer with Where Jesus Prayed.



Snowstorm- Greg Wolfe rescheduled for 2/15

 

 

Tuesday: Donald Maldari, S.J. is a Catholic theologian who earned a doctorate and a master’s degree at Katholieke Universiteit Leuven and a bachelor’s degree at Georgetown University. A member of the Society of Jesus since 1977, Professor Maldari began his teaching The Creed: the Faith That Moves Evolutioncareer in 1980. Having a keen interest in ecclesiology and spirituality, he has taught at Le Moyne College since 1999. Father Maldari, fluent in five non-native languages, has ministered as a chaplain in a Mexican prison and by teaching and providing spiritual direction in Haiti

Wednesday: EncoreFreedom & Forgiveness: A Fresh look at the Sacrament of ReconciliationFr. Paul Farren a native of Clonmany in Co. Donegal, was ordained in 1997. He studied in St Patrick’s College, Maynooth and in the Catholic University of America, Washington DC.  He served as a curate in Derry City from 1997 – 2004.   Fr. Paul has served as Director of Religious Education in the Freedom and Forgiveness: A Fresh Look at the Sacrament of ReconciliationDerry Diocese and the Director of the Catechetical Centre as well as administrator of St. Eugene’s Cathedral and Long Tower Church. He has also been a vocations director in the Diocese of Derry for the last 14 years.  In 2006 he founded The Pope John Paul II Award to help young people become more involved in their parish community. Fr. Paul joins us to discuss Freedom and Forgiveness: A Fresh Look at the Sacrament of Reconciliation.

Thursday: Karee Santos, will be joining  us again this time to talk about how to celebrate Valentine’s during Lent as a family. Karee and husband, Manuel P. Santos, M.D., a psychiatrist, began teaching marriage preparation and enrichment classes in New York City in 2003. Their Catholic marriage advice book The Four Keys to Everlasting Love will be published by Ave Maria Press in 2016. She also blogs aCan We Cana? a community to support Catholic Marriages.

Friday:  Ordained a Franciscan priest in 1983, Albert Haase, OFM, is a popular preacher, teacher, spiritual director and radio talk show Saying Yes: Discovering and Responding to God's Will in Your Lifeguest. A former missionary to mainland China for over eleven years, he is the award-winning author of nine books on popular spirituality and the presenter on four bestselling DVDs. He trains spiritual directors in the diocese of Springfield, IL. He lives in Texas. Visit his website at www.AlbertOFM.org