Catechesis of Mercy 2

Continuing from the previous week , we go deeper to the underlying principles of a life steeped in and committed to mercy..

There are four core principles in the Catholic Church’s social teaching: respect and protection of the dignity of the human person, the pursuit of the common good, the value of solidarity, and subsidiarity—that matters are if possible to be handled at the lowest level, by those most affected. With each pope in succession, through  papal encyclicals—and most notably in the Second Vatican Council, there has been a reaffirmation of these teachings..  This is why an essential element of a catechesis of mercy involves service and active works of mercy.

Look around your community, are there service learning projects that are already available in your community that you might participate in with your child or if they are old enough that they can join in themselves? There is no need to reinvent the wheel, if a suitable service activity is already up and running. Yet, if none of these seem fitting, consider developing a new service based project. What are needs in your area that aren’t being met? What are some possible solutions? What are the resources that you might can tap into?

There are several types of service..

Direct (whereby the participate is in direct contact with the person/s they are working with. Examples include volunteering at a nursing home to read or visit, doing yardwork or chores for the elderly, or working at a soup kitchen.

Indirect (Involves fundraising, or drives to assist people in need) An example would be a toy drive for a local children’s hospital, clothing drive for a homeless shelter, or making cards or placemats.

Promotion or advocacy (Getting the word out about a cause, and working to convince the government, or organization to make a change in behavior. ) Maybe you have a gift of telling or motivating others to get involved in a cause. If so then this might be where you feel most helpful.

Whatever you choose to do, reflection is a very essential part of service learning both in deciding what to commit to as well as what was taken from the experience. This is where a trained group leader is very beneficial, both to guide the questions but to show the diversity of the experiences.

What did you expect this experience to be like?
Was there anything different from this expectation?
Did you find anything challenging and/or surprising?
Was there an opportunity to talk with those whom you were helping? If so, did you learn anything new?
What is the relationship between your service and your faith?
How does your participation in this activity affect a situation or create change in the lives of those you are with?
Is it important for you to stay involved with this activity?

Remember that it is never too early to begin a catechesis of mercy, and that your child already has that divine love within and the capacity to show that love to others. We have been given a freedom to choose love and goodness in the world, to avoid what is destructive or harmful, and to make these choices quite early in life. And though not always easy choices, it is these moments that help shape us, form us and continue to define us as we grow in our Christian discipleship.

Reconciliation

As mentioned earlier, reconciliation is indelibly linked to mercy. God is loving and forgiving, God is merciful. God forgives us when we have done wrong, when we come wishing to forgiven, and desire to be in relationship once again. If your child is old enough to have celebrated the sacrament of reconciliation before, take the time to discuss its continued importance in the life of the individual and the church.
1. Discuss how to make a good confession and examination of conscience http://www.thelightisonforyou.org/confession/

2. Set aside a time to go to reconciliation as a family. Allowing your child to glimpse the importance of reconciliation for you is an essential way for him/her to see its importance in their own life as well.

3. Reflect on how God’s love and mercy is always present and calling us into relationship.
Look at the broader understandings of reconciliation within the community and world. For ideas visit St Vincent de Paul.org, Catholic Charities, Catholic Relief Services, and the Childrens’ Missionary Association which is part of the Pontifical Society.
Discuss the importance of and ways to work for peace both locally and global

Mercy is like a small seed that requires our active participation in the planting and growing, allowing God to be the master gardener and harvester of the fruits.[1] To extend this analogy, we cannot plant that which we do not see or understand. Likewise, how could we then tend to the requirements necessary for its growth? Therefore, it is clear that first we must become aware of the poor, and the marginalized and desire to walk with them to understand their journey. Then our hearts and steps are to be guided towards recognizing our own need to take responsibility, and the essential right to a greater voice and participation in society of the least of these. Together, as a people of faith, we can then “water” those seeds planted to witness their rooting within the hearts of individuals, and the communities in which we live. While fully aware of the resistance of many for change, a catechesis of mercy relies not solely on our own efforts. But rather on the power of God for strength, and guidance to accomplish the realization of all efforts. Hope then is what our trust in God provides, it is faith that God’s love and mercy are unfailing, and that we are part of his divine plan for the world.

Peace,

Signature


[1] Brady,Bernard. Essential Catholic Social Thought. Orbis Books, 2008.

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A Catechesis of Mercy: Part 1

The Beginnings of Mercy

Mercy begins not when we are old enough to study social justice teaching, but indeed began before we are born. It began with God, fulfilled in Christ and is to be continued with each one of us. Thus, it is not an add-on to our Christian discipleship but inherently intertwined in every aspect of our understanding and living out of the faith. For, the very root of mercy is love.

Without love, as St. Paul reminds us, we are nothing. All of our gifts, and actions are useless if not used or performed out of love. Mercy is an indelible part of love, the love of neighbor and other above ourselves. It is to walk beside, among and through the ins and outs, the ups and downs of all that our lives here have to offer. Simply put it is the gift of ourselves, to ease the suffering or pain of another, when there seems to be no other gift that is worthy enough. It is the work of our hands, our feet and soul that bring joy into everyday realities of our existence. Moreover it is to see Christ in others, and then to accept the invitation to be Christ to others.

Not just to those we know personally, or belong to our parish but to those living outside the doors of our church, in our communities that often go unnoticed. Here on the fringes of society, are our homeless and poor, our elderly, those suffering from addiction and their families, and the victims as well as the perpetrators of violence. As Christ has shown, mercy cannot be earned but is the grace of the great love that our Father has for each and every one of us.

See mercy goes hand in hand with the grace of reconciliation. Mercy is not something conferred upon someone thought of to be most in need of it, but indeed is a shared grace whereby all are reminded of their humanity and the infinite love they share in Christ. It is the opportunity to not only witness the transformation of the life of another, but to be transformed ourselves.

So, what is meant by a Catechesis of Mercy?

As parents, we are our child’s first teacher. And, looking to us for guidance, approval and encouragement we have been given a beautiful gift to model the faith we profess. In the Beatitudes (Matthew 5:7) Jesus says, “Blessed are the merciful for they shall obtain Mercy”.

  • The need for mercy: You need not go far to see that there is a tremendous need for mercy right in front of us.  As St. Teresa of Calcutta has said,

“Stay where you are. Find your own Calcutta. Find the sick, the suffering and the lonely right there where you are — in your own homes and in your own families, in your workplaces and in your schools. … You can find Calcutta all over the world, if you have the eyes to see. Everywhere, wherever you go, you find people who are unwanted, unloved, uncared for, just rejected by society — completely forgotten, completely left alone.” †
In talking to you child about what mercy means, be sure to provide clear relatable examples.

  • Explain that mercy is more than feeling sorry for someone, it is compassion in action. It is more than a feeling but meeting that person where they are, in their sadness, embarrassment..skinned knees and all. God’s love for us in Christ is to produce love within us moving us toward love, care, and concern for those in need. This love seeks to love and serve our neighbor it gives purpose to all that we are to do.
  • Looking to Christ: Christ’s time here with us serves as an example of His mercy and what we too are to do as his disciples. Discuss with your child different ways that Christ revealed the meaning of mercy in his ministry .1. Jesus didn’t just meet with those from a similar background, but invited all to table..most often those who were on the fringes of Jewish society, the tax collector, the leper, the poor, the lost. He did not discriminate based on gender, race or nationality…his mercy was universal.
    2. Parable of the Good Samaritan, presents a beautiful opportunity to illustrate that in the course of our daily lives that we too may walk past someone in need of mercy though we should be the first to help.
    3. Feeding of the Multitudes – Luke 9:10-17
    4. Opening the Eyes of the Man Born Blind – John 9:1-17
    5. Good thief on the cross- Even on the cross, Jesus offered love, mercy and forgiveness to the one who though living a life earning him death on earth had chosen to believe and gained an eternal life with Christ in heaven.
  • Looking to the Church– Consider ways that we as a church through service help those in need. Here we can look to the corporal works of mercy which entail feeding the hungry, sheltering the homeless, clothing the naked, visiting the sick and imprisoned, and burying the dead. Taking care of our poor, is not just an act of charity but a measure of justice and love. It is returning to them what has been reserved for them by Christ. The Church is not to be a church of the proud and powerful but indeed is as Pope Francis has observed to be a church of the poor. “We need to be evangelized by them.. for there is so much to learn” They are to be our guide in understanding God’s love us.

Tune in next week for Part 2!

Peace,

Signature

CatholicTV: Guest Appearance

Today, perhaps you might have been expecting a lengthier post? Well, I hope that I am forgiven by sharing with you the fruits of a graced invitation.. to be a guest on CatholicTV’s “This is the Day”!

With a cup of coffee and toast in hand, I headed out the door expecting a flurry of brake lights and delays as customary with Fridays in Boston. Yet, instead God seemed almost to clear the roads giving way to time and a very relaxing ride into the city. So much so, in fact, my hubby and I arrived well in time to also make morning Mass at the station.

Every day that begins with Mass, for me,  is an intentional one in that as the 1st reading from Deuteronomy spoke:
“you must now know, and fix in your heart, that the LORD is God in the heavens above and on earth below, and that there is no other. ”

Once God is given priority, then comes trust in His will. Father Helfrich’s homily on Matthew 16:24-28 was so on point. Much courage is needed to be a disciple, trusting in the plan that our Lord has for us,  leaving the security of the known to embrace unknown opportunities ahead. Still having difficulties doing this? You are not alone, but oh what joy lies in “giving it a try”!

If you were unable to tune in for the live show on August 11..here is the podcast from the show! What a great time I had with Jay and Kevin. The time just flew by! There was even a shout out to Loyola Chicago!

Simply click the image below (Interview begins @ 20:00 ).

 

 

Peace,

Signature

 

An Engaging Faith: 8/31-9/6

You are invited to join me this week for An Engaging Faith on Breadbox Media daily at 4pm EST.

Enter To Win a Copy of Pray with Me  by Grace Urbanski (Ave Maria Publishing)  or A Catechist’s Backpack by Joe Paprocki (Loyola Press)

Drawing runs 8/30-9/6 Click to enter..Back To School4

Get prepared for Back to school with all the right tools prayer, leadership,and a deepening spirituality  …

With Grace Urbanski of Pray with Me, Chris Lowney of Heroic Leadership and Pope Francis:Why He Leads The Way He LeadsJoe Paprocki with A Catechist’s Backpackand Margaret Felice, with “Felice Fridays”, our Catholic round table discussion.

And an Encore of  Barb Gilman as she chats about integrating technology and creativity in the classroom. 

Monday: Grace Urbanski  is director of Children’s Ministry for the Apostleship of Prayer in the United States. She is a blogger at Praying with Grace and contributor to CatholicMom.com and its Gospel Reflection Team, Catholic Bloggers Network, Catholic 365, and the Association of Catholic Women Bloggers. A graduate of Marquette University, Grace serves as a keynote speaker and workshop designer for marriage-preparation and married-couple events for the Archdiocese of Milwaukee and frequently speaks to parents, teachers, and children throughout the United States in her role with the Apostleship of Prayer. 
 

 

 

Tuesday: Barb Gilman
, Catholic School Teacher, 2014 NCEA Distinguished Teacher- Plains States, co-organizer of #CatholicEdChat Saturday 8am CT – Co-founder of EdCampArchOmaha and blogger at Barb In Nebraska.com

 

 

 

Wednesday: Chris Lowney  a former Jesuit, served as Managing Director at J.P. Morgan in New York, Tokyo, Singapore, and London for seventeen years. Lowney has been featured in Forbes, the Harvard Business Review, and FastCompany.com and currently lives in New York where he is a consultant for the Catholic Medical Mission Board. A popular speaker on issues around leadership, he is the author of the best-selling Heroic Leadership, Heroic Living, and Pope Francis: Why He leads the Way He Leads.

 

Thursday: Joe Paprocki,  is National Consultant for Faith Formation at Loyola Press. He has his doctorate and more than 30 years of experience in ministry having taught at many different levels. He is the author of numerous books, including the bestselling The Catechist’s Toolbox Series, Practice Makes Catholic and A Well-Built Faith and the host of A Catechists Journey.

 

 
 

Felice Fridays!: Margaret FeliceBoston College alumnae and faculty member of Religion and Performing Arts at BC High in Boston MA, Opera Singer and blogger joins us for a fun an engaging talk about all things Catholic