Worth Revisiting: The Grace We Need

If she could stand, she would undoubtedly comprise all of 5 feet. Slowly, age and physical limitations have taken her ability to walk, then stand and the wheelchair that she once could move can no longer be done on her own. Yet on the inside “Grace” towers, a living witness to a profound spirituality, her inspiring reverence and appreciation for the Eucharist is faithfully compelling.  In her suffering, she has shared not only of her struggle but of the gift and essentialness of communion and community.

It was about 6 years ago in the beginning of our Eucharistic Ministry to the nursing homes, that my husband and I first met Grace. My husband, having left Harvard when our economy took a major downturn was initially unsure of this assignment but more than ready to feel of use again. While he was certain that he could impart a bit of company and joy to those he visited in fulfilling this ministry, he was not prepared for what he would receive in return. His week spent researching the classifieds and applying for new jobs, would prove relentless with the exception of Sunday. Always faithful, but at times lukewarm in intensity, Sunday was the day he reserved for God. Little did he know that God had so much more in store for him, by this simple step forward in faith.

While wanting to go with him in these first few visits, I prayerfully held back, feeling God was preparing John for something special. So, with pyx in hand and a head full of concerns I watched as John hurriedly left the house, unquestionably working on the following day’s to-do list. However, no matter how he left the house, one could not help but notice that he never returned the same. In its place, peace and joy had consumed his countenance and he practically overflowed with a renewed strength. For, during this otherwise incredibly stressful time, God had opened a window.

After a bit of time, of observing all of this, the day came when with hopeful expectation he suddenly  asked,  “Would you like to go with me today? There is someone I would like you to meet.”   This was the moment I had patiently waited for.  “Of course, lead the way!”.  Though he carried a handwritten list of names and rooms, with notes beside each, it would be completely unnecessary. He knew each one, and wasted no time in introducing me as we entered with a rap at the door.

As we neared the last room he paused, grabbed my hand and a huge smile overtook his face. This was the one he so eagerly had wanted to share, the one that had inspired the transformation that I witnessed.

“Hi Grace!”, it’s John from St. Peter’s, “I brought my lovely wife Elizabeth with me today..”
“It is really SO good to see you, thank you for coming and making time for me..I cannot tell you what this means”, she exclaimed.
Then chatting for a few min about our families, health and week, John asked Grace, would you like to receive communion?”
“Oh, Yes! I REALLY need that!” , with hands clasped and eyes closing immediately in prayer.
“We all do Grace, we all do..” he answered without hesitation.

Have you ever considered Eucharistic ministry? Be prepared, the life transformed by Christ today, might be your own!

Advertisements

A Pilgrim’s Journal: Sea of Galilee & Mount of Beatitudes

 

But the boat was already a long distance from the land, battered by the waves; for the wind was contrary.. 

Just the night before I spent hours wide awake with no respite from the events of the day. In my thoughts I pleaded for sleep as I knew that, body and soul, I needed rest. Feeling a bit “battered by the waves” myself  I prayed realizing that grace can be found here too. And, in my unrest that he called me out upon the water. Rather than sinking, I chose this time to take one step at a time. My heart responding and as I take each step eyes transfixed on our Lord, I feel no fear. These calm waters I embrace, this peace I seek to keep. You are the Christ and I am in awe of who you are. Here in these moments I appreciate profoundly the difference between spiritual peace and unrest.

“Blessed are the peacemakers for they shall inherit the earth”

Within the first five minutes at the Mount of Beatitudes, I suddenly discovered myself an unwelcome guest by the colony of red ants who previously occupied the seat that I had chosen. Deciding to walk it off, I soon felt their keen sting and began to wonder how my time here would be spent. Yet as I began to walk on, I found the spot where I had been called. A picturesque scene unfolded before my eyes as I overlooked the Sea of Galilee. At least 15 minutes passed as I stood there gazing at the Sea. My heart could not contain my feelings- a dichotomy of tranquility and overwhelming joy bringing me to tears. And there I heard Christ’s words yet again…”Blessed are the peacemakers”.

A peacemaker- an essential part of the very nature of my soul, yet still not something that I was content with calling a gift. Peacemakers, I had ascertained, are rarely welcomed unless successful. Each side clinging to their understanding yet unwilling or unable to move. Yet this, I realized in that instant was what Jesus was asking me to do- and who he created me to be. With tears streaming down my face, I finally made peace with being a peacemaker.

Processing into the church itself, I fell to my knees in front of the cross. To my delight, in gazing up to its center was Christ himself as the Blessed Sacrament. Above that still, a dove sat perched on the high arch above the altar waiting for me to notice it. Then in a fluttering of wings, it was gone. Kneeling there for some time, I thanked God for the gift of himself and for the opportunity to give him praise for the gifts he had given me.

Oh my Jesus, you are the preeminent consoler and author of all good gifts. Enable us to both discern and accept your gifts that you have placed within. And strengthen us for the steps ahead as we seek to put your plans into action.

Peace,

Signature

Worth Revisiting: A Catechesis of Mercy Part 1

The Beginnings of Mercy

Mercy begins not when we are old enough to study social justice teaching, but indeed began before we are born. It began with God, fulfilled in Christ and is to be continued with each one of us. Thus, it is not an add-on to our Christian discipleship but inherently intertwined in every aspect of our understanding and living out of the faith. For, the very root of mercy is love.

Without love, as St. Paul reminds us, we are nothing. All of our gifts, and actions are useless if not used or performed out of love. Mercy is an indelible part of love, the love of neighbor and other above ourselves. It is to walk beside, among and through the ins and outs, the ups and downs of all that our lives here have to offer. Simply put it is the gift of ourselves, to ease the suffering or pain of another, when there seems to be no other gift that is worthy enough. It is the work of our hands, our feet and soul that bring joy into everyday realities of our existence. Moreover it is to see Christ in others, and then to accept the invitation to be Christ to others.

Not just to those we know personally, or belong to our parish but to those living outside the doors of our church, in our communities that often go unnoticed. Here on the fringes of society, are our homeless and poor, our elderly, those suffering from addiction and their families, and the victims as well as the perpetrators of violence. As Christ has shown, mercy cannot be earned but is the grace of the great love that our Father has for each and every one of us.

See mercy goes hand in hand with the grace of reconciliation. Mercy is not something conferred upon someone thought of to be most in need of it, but indeed is a shared grace whereby all are reminded of their humanity and the infinite love they share in Christ. It is the opportunity to not only witness the transformation of the life of another, but to be transformed ourselves.

So, what is meant by a Catechesis of Mercy?

As parents, we are our child’s first teacher. And, looking to us for guidance, approval and encouragement we have been given a beautiful gift to model the faith we profess. In the Beatitudes (Matthew 5:7) Jesus says, “Blessed are the merciful for they shall obtain Mercy”.

  • The need for mercy: You need not go far to see that there is a tremendous need for mercy right in front of us.  As St. Teresa of Calcutta has said,

“Stay where you are. Find your own Calcutta. Find the sick, the suffering and the lonely right there where you are — in your own homes and in your own families, in your workplaces and in your schools. … You can find Calcutta all over the world, if you have the eyes to see. Everywhere, wherever you go, you find people who are unwanted, unloved, uncared for, just rejected by society — completely forgotten, completely left alone.” †
In talking to you child about what mercy means, be sure to provide clear relatable examples.

  • Explain that mercy is more than feeling sorry for someone, it is compassion in action. It is more than a feeling but meeting that person where they are, in their sadness, embarrassment..skinned knees and all. God’s love for us in Christ is to produce love within us moving us toward love, care, and concern for those in need. This love seeks to love and serve our neighbor it gives purpose to all that we are to do.
  • Looking to Christ: Christ’s time here with us serves as an example of His mercy and what we too are to do as his disciples. Discuss with your child different ways that Christ revealed the meaning of mercy in his ministry .1. Jesus didn’t just meet with those from a similar background, but invited all to table..most often those who were on the fringes of Jewish society, the tax collector, the leper, the poor, the lost. He did not discriminate based on gender, race or nationality…his mercy was universal.
    2. Parable of the Good Samaritan, presents a beautiful opportunity to illustrate that in the course of our daily lives that we too may walk past someone in need of mercy though we should be the first to help.
    3. Feeding of the Multitudes – Luke 9:10-17
    4. Opening the Eyes of the Man Born Blind – John 9:1-17
    5. Good thief on the cross- Even on the cross, Jesus offered love, mercy and forgiveness to the one who though living a life earning him death on earth had chosen to believe and gained an eternal life with Christ in heaven.
  • Looking to the Church– Consider ways that we as a church through service help those in need. Here we can look to the corporal works of mercy which entail feeding the hungry, sheltering the homeless, clothing the naked, visiting the sick and imprisoned, and burying the dead. Taking care of our poor, is not just an act of charity but a measure of justice and love. It is returning to them what has been reserved for them by Christ. The Church is not to be a church of the proud and powerful but indeed is as Pope Francis has observed to be a church of the poor. “We need to be evangelized by them.. for there is so much to learn” They are to be our guide in understanding God’s love us.

Tune in next week for Part 2!

Peace,

Signature

A Pilgrims Journal: The Church of the Transfiguration

A little more than a week ago I returned from a graced pilgrimage to the Holy Land. Each site now holds for me spiritual remembrance where, if I close my eyes, my soul is instantly transported. With words waxed poetically and where there were no words at all, God spoke.  Where the scriptures came alive, I took my place walking at times beside, behind and enveloped by the living Christ.

 The Franciscan Church of the Transfiguration on Mt. Tabor is a magnificent scene to behold, overlooking the Jezreel plain in Galilee. According to scriptures (Matthew 17:1-9; Mark 9: 2-8 and Luke 9:28-36) that the divine incarnation of Christ was revealed to the apostles as Jesus was transfigured before their very eyes.  And just as with Jesus’ baptism, God spoke with clarity as to who Jesus was.

“After six days Jesus took with him Peter, James and John the brother of James, and led them up a high mountain by themselves.  There he was transfigured before them. His face shone like the sun, and his clothes became as white as the light.  Just then there appeared before them Moses and Elijah, talking with Jesus. Peter said to Jesus, “Lord, it is good for us to be here. If you wish, I will put up three shelters—one for you, one for Moses and one for Elijah.” While he was still speaking, a bright cloud covered them, and a voice from the cloud said, “This is my Son, whom I love; with him I am well pleased. Listen to him!” When the disciples heard this, they fell facedown to the ground, terrified.  But Jesus came and touched them. “Get up,” he said. “Don’t be afraid.” When they looked up, they saw no one except Jesus.

(The following conversation is the reciprocity of my own heart to the scene that lay before me.)

 Here I am again in Your gardens, led by your hand having witnessed your splendor. Being given this time to ponder Your love for me. Offered this moment to remember who you have called me to be. Today, I recognize my surprisingly subtle demeanor is at odds with my spirit inside. Who ablaze is all consuming refusing to stay quiet and hide.

“Proclaim my love”, You say, ” In all the world let it be known”. In all creation there is no other, in all the heavens no one above. For You are Lord and this is my joy, my hope, the sum of  a disciple life’s reward. The harmony in the chaos-the remedy to new found discord. Transforming, yet disarming you ask me to follow without delay. Father, grant that I may know you better, love you greater and serve you endlessly until your face I see one day.

As I sit in the gardens atop Mt. Tabor, surrounding the site of Your transfiguration, I cannot help but be drawn to praise. Like the apostles, I seek to comprehend all that You are. To glean through a gradual unfolding of Your mysteries the fullness of your words- the gift of your presence.True God and true man, I am in awe of who You are and desire to be in my life. Oh the glories You yearn to show me and the mercy given that is greater than all of my sin!

This day I bring to you the many intentions carried here- to this place on Your holy mountain. My Lord carry them with you up to the heavens. Leaving only Your peace. And in times of Your absence, let me not be passive but let me desire the intimacy of Your forgiving embrace. This is reconciliation – this is love set ablaze. And it all happens in the stillness of a gentle breeze.

Peace,

Signature

Worth Revisiting: CatholicTV Appearance

Today, perhaps you might have been expecting a lengthier post? Well, I hope that I am forgiven by sharing with you the fruits of a graced invitation.. to be a guest on CatholicTV’s “This is the Day”!

With a cup of coffee and toast in hand, I headed out the door expecting a flurry of brake lights and delays as customary with Fridays in Boston. Yet, instead God seemed almost to clear the roads giving way to time and a very relaxing ride into the city. So much so, in fact, my hubby and I arrived well in time to also make morning Mass at the station.

Every day that begins with Mass, for me,  is an intentional one in that as the 1st reading from Deuteronomy spoke:
“you must now know, and fix in your heart, that the LORD is God in the heavens above and on earth below, and that there is no other. ”

Once God is given priority, then comes trust in His will. Father Helfrich’s homily on Matthew 16:24-28 was so on point. Much courage is needed to be a disciple, trusting in the plan that our Lord has for us,  leaving the security of the known to embrace unknown opportunities ahead. Still having difficulties doing this? You are not alone, but oh what joy lies in “giving it a try”!

If you were unable to tune in for the live show on August 11 2017..here is the podcast from the show! What a great time I had with Jay and Kevin. The time just flew by! There was even a shout out to Loyola Chicago!

Simply click the image below.

Peace,

Signature

Worth Revisiting: Examening Discovery

As a child, I reveled at the picture puzzle games that challenged each contestant with keen eyes to discover a familiar item amid a quite often cluttered larger scene. And with each object found, was a renewed sense of joy and understanding of the next step of the task at hand.  Yet, somewhere between childhood and maturity the thrill and purpose of the search can time and again allude us and at times even eclipse the delight of discovery.

Such was the course of a day that was to be experienced quite recently. Waking up late, and feeling “behind the 8 ball”, I had literally jumped feet first into a scene not of my own design or desire. With limited movement, either physically or spiritually, all that could initially be seen was the clutter. Misplaced item here, piles of unattended objects there, I longed for clarity of purpose- at the very least, for the frustration and confusion to leave me be. In this life sized puzzle of sorts it became suddenly obvious that the first hidden object of my search was indeed Christ himself. He, and only he, was the hingepin to finding my next piece of my day and the surest course of making sense of it all. So began my prayer- an inner groan, offered up for peace of spirit and discernment in the way God wanted me to move in my day.

“Where are YOU, Jesus, in this jumbled scene?”

A prayerful guide to mindful reflection, the daily Examen prayer, is at its heart a path to awareness and renewed discovery. Just what exactly are we discovering? Perhaps simply our way back to God and his will in our daily walk. Sometimes, we may not have strayed far but have just lost sight of Christ within the daily tasks we tend to for family and work. How long till we see the results? That too cannot be rushed, as we well know that God’s timing is not our own. I will say, however, that I have yet to be disappointed to discover that whatever I am going through, that God is there in the midst of it all.

Discovery then, in Ignatian spirituality, is the fruit of prayer directed towards the good desire. It could be the answer to a life altering decision, or an awareness that we are exactly where we need to be. If you are facing a difficulty today that you cannot see through, or need clarity of purpose or direction, ask yourself these as you begin the Examen:

Would this decision lead me or others on a life affirming course? Am I filled with confusion, doubt, fear or instead, encouraged and invited gently to consider the next step?

5 Steps of a Daily Examen

1. Become aware of God’s presence.
2. Review the day with gratitude.
3. Pay attention to your emotions.
4. Choose one feature of the day and pray from it. 
5. Look toward tomorrow.

 Peace,

Signature